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Confederate Statue Will Not Return To Reidsville Intersection

2:04 PM, Aug 10, 2011   |    comments
  • The head of the confederate statue that stood in downtown Reidsville for more than 100 years before it was knocked down by a driver. June 2011.
  • The base of the confederate statue that stood in downtown Reidsville for more than 100 years before it was knocked down by a driver. June 2011.
    
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Reidsville, NC -- A confederate soldier statue that was damaged by a sleepy driver in May will not return to its Scales Street location.

The city determined that statue was owned by the United Daughter's of the Confederacy (UDC).  That group told the city it had decided not to return the statue to its former location.

A letter to the city from Aileen Ezell, the President of the North Carolina UDC stated: "While we much prefer the monument to remain in the location it has occupied for the past 100 years, we do not wish to be a factor in any unpleasantness that may occur if the statue is allowed to remain in its present location."

The statue was struck by Mark Anthony Vincent of Greensboro on May 23.  Vincent told police that he fell asleep at the wheel.

A news release from the city of Reidsville states that Ezell and the UDC are working with the city to determine alternative locations for the statue including the Confederate area of the city owned Greenview Cemetary or a museum.

No firm plans have been decided since the United Daughter's of the Confederacy are still working with the insurance company on replacing the statue.

HISTORY OF OWNERSHIP (from City Of Reidsville)

The placement of the statue as well as its ownership has been in question since a motorist hit the monument in the early morning hours of May 23.

The UDC had raised the funds to erect the statue in 1910, but present-day City leaders assumed the statue had been gifted to the City. However, a review of public records by City Attorney William F. McLeod Jr. did not show any evidence that the statue had ever been donated to the City of Reidsville.

Council minutes dated April 5, 1910 do reflect that a request was made by the UDC to place the soldier in the intersection, but they did not indicate the statue was a donation to the City.

The September 2 1924 minutes showed that City officials requested instructions from the UDC when planning to replace the fence around the monument with a wall, which also indicates the UDC may have been the owner.

GoDanRiver.com

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